Deploy a Dockerized ASP.NET Core Application to Azure Kubernetes Service Using a VSTS CI/CD Pipeline: Part 3

Posted by Graham Smith on May 24, 2018No Comments (click here to comment)

In this blog post series I'm working my way through the process of deploying and running an ASP.NET Core application on Microsoft's hosted Kubernetes environment. Formerly known as Azure Container Service (AKS), it has recently been renamed Azure Kubernetes Service, which is why the title of my blog series has changed slightly. In previous posts in this series I covered the key configuration elements both on a developer workstation and in Azure and VSTS and then how to actually deploy a simple ASP.NET Core application to AKS using VSTS. This is the full series of posts to date:

In this post I introduce MegaStore (just a fictional name), a more complicated ASP.NET Core application (in the sense that it has more moving parts), and I show how to deploy MegaStore to an AKS cluster using VSTS. Future posts will use MegaStore as I work through more advanced Kubernetes concepts. To follow along with this post you will need to have completed the following, variously from parts 1 and 2:

Introducing MegaStore

MegaStore was inspired by Elton Stoneman's evolution of NerdDinner for his excellent book Docker on Windows, which I have read and can thoroughly recommend. The concept is a sales application that rather than saving a ‘sale' directly to a database, instead adds it to a message queue. A handler monitors the queue and pulls new messages for saving to an Azure SQL Database. The main components are as follows:

  • MegaStore.Web—an ASP.NET Core MVC application with a CreateSale method in the HomeController that gets called every time there is a hit on the home page.
  • NATS message queue—to which a new sale is published.
  • MegaStore.SaveSalehandler—a .NET Core console application that monitors the NATS message queue and saves new messages.
  • Azure SQL Database—I recently heard Brendan Burns comment in a podcast that hardly anybody designing a new cloud application should be managing storage themselves. I agree and for simplicity I have chosen to use Azure SQL Database for all my environments including development.

You can clone MegaStore from my GitHub repository here.

In order to run the complete application you will first need to create an Azure SQL Database. The easiest way is probably to create a new database (also creates a server at the same time) via the portal and manage with SQL Server Management Studio. The high-level procedure is as follows:

  1. In the portal create a new database called MegaStoreDev and at the same time create a new server (name needs to be unique). To keep costs low I start with the Basic configuration knowing I can scale up and down as required.
  2. Still in the portal add a client IP to the firewall so you can connect from your development machine.
  3. Connect to the server/database in SSMS and create a new table called dbo.Sale:
  4. In Security > Logins create a New Login called sales_user_dev, noting the password.
  5. In Databases > MegaStoreDev > Security > Users create a New User called sales_user mapped to the sales_user_dev login and with the db_owner role.

In order to avoid exposing secrets via GitHub the credentials to access the database are stored in a file called db-credentials.env which I've not committed to the repo. You'll need to create this file in the docker-compose project in your VS solution and add the following, modified for your server name and database credentials:

If you are using version control make sure you exclude db-credentials.env from being committed.

With docker-compose set as the startup project and Docker for Windows running set to Linux containers you should now be able to run the application. If everything is working you should be able to see sales being created in the database.

To understand how the components are configured you need to look at docker-compose.yml and docker-compose-override.yml. Image building is handled by docker-compose.yml, which can't have anything else in it otherwise VSTS complains if you want to use the compose file to build the images. The configuration of the components is specified in docker-compose-override.yml which gets merged with docker-compose.yml at run time. Notice the k8s folder. This contains the configuration files needed to deploy the application to AKS.

By now you may be wondering if MegaStore should be running locally under Kubernetes rather than in Docker via docker-compose. It's a good question and the answer is probably yes. However at the time of writing there isn't a great story to tell about how Visual Studio integrates with Kubernetes on a developer workstation (ie to allow debugging as is possible with Docker) so I'm purposely ignoring this for the time being. This will change over time though, and I will cover this when I think there is more to tell.

Create Azure SQL Databases for Different Release Pipeline Environments

I'll be creating a release pipeline consisting of DAT and PRD environments. I explain more about these below but to support these environments you'll need to create two new databases—MegaStoreDat and MegaStorePrd. You can do this either through the Azure portal or through SQL Server Management Studio, however be aware that if you use SSMS you'll end up on the standard pricing tier rather than the cheaper basic tier. Either way, you then use SQL Server Management Studio to create dbo.Sale and set up security as described above, ensuring that you create different logins for the different environments.

Create a Build in VSTS

Once everything is working locally the next step is to switch over to VSTS and create a build. I'm assuming that you've cloned my GitHub repo to your own GitHub account however if you are doing it another way (your repo is in VSTS for example) you'll need to amend accordingly.

  1. Create a new Build definition in VSTS. The first thing you get asked is to select a repository—link to your GitHub account and select the MegaStore repo:
  2. When you get asked to Choose a template go for the Empty process option.
  3. Rename the build to something like MegaStore and under Agent queue select your private build agent.
  4. In the Triggers tab check Enable continuous integration.
  5. In the Options tab set Build number format to $(Date:yyyyMMdd)$(Rev:.rr), or something meaningful to you based on the available options described here.
  6. In the Tasks tab use the + icon to add two Docker Compose tasks and a Publish Build Artifacts task. Note that when configuring the tasks below only the required entries and changes to defaults are listed.
  7. Configure the first Docker Compose task as follows:
    1. Display name = Build service images
    2. Action = Build service images
    3. Azure subscription = [name of existing Azure Resource Manager endpoint]
    4. Azure Container Registry = [name of existing Azure Container Registry]
    5. Additional Image Tags = $(Build.BuildNumber)
  8. Configure the first Docker Compose task as follows:
    1. Display name = Push service images
    2. Azure subscription = [name of existing Azure Resource Manager endpoint]
    3. Azure Container Registry = [name of existing Azure Container Registry]
    4. Action = Push service images
    5. Additional Image Tags = $(Build.BuildId)
  9. Configure the Publish Build Artifacts task as follows:
    1. Display name = Publish k8s config
    2. Path to publish = k8s
    3. Artifact name = k8s-config
    4. Artifact publish location = Visual Studio Team Services/TFS

You should now be able to test the build by committing a minor change to the source code. The build should pass and if you look in the Repositories section of your Container Registry you should see megastoreweb and megastoresavesalehandler repositories with newly created images.

Create a DAT Release Environment in VSTS

With the build working it's now time to create the release pipeline, starting with an environment I call DAT which is where automated acceptance testing might take place. At this point there is a style choice to be made for creating Kubernetes Secrets and ConfigMaps. They can be configured from files or from literal values. I've gone down the literal values route since the files route needs to specify the namespace and this would require either a separate file for each namespace creating a DRY problem or editing the config files as part of the release pipeline. To me the literal values technique seems cleaner. Either way, as far as I can tell there is no way to update a Secret or ConfigMap via a VSTS Deploy to Kubernetes task as it's a two step process and the task can't handle this. The workaround is a task to delete the Secret or ConfigMap and then a task to create it. You'll see that I've also chosen to explicitly create the image pull secret. This is partly because of a bug in the Deploy to Kubernetes task however it also avoids having to repeat a lot of the Secrets configuration in Deploy to Kubernetes tasks that deploy service or deployment configurations.

  1. Create a new release definition in VSTS, electing to start with an empty process and rename it MegaStore.
  2. In the Pipeline tab click on Add artifact and link the build that was just created which in turn makes the k8s-config artifact from step 9 above available in the release.
  3. Click on the lightning bolt to enable the Continuous deployment trigger.
  4. Still in the Pipeline tab rename Environment 1 to DAT, with the overall changes resulting in something like this:
  5. In the Tasks tab click on Agent phase and under Agent queue select your private build agent.
  6. In the Variables tab create the following variables with Release Scope:
    1. AcrAuthenticationSecretName = prmcrauth (or the name you are using for imagePullSecrets in the Kubernetes config files)
    2. AcrName = [unique name of your Azure Container Registry, eg mine is prmcr]
    3. AcrPassword = [password of your Azure Container Registry from Settings > Access keys], use the padlock to make it a secret
  7.  In the Variables tab create the following variables with DAT Scope:
    1. DatDbConn = Server=tcp:megastore.database.windows.net,1433;Initial Catalog=MegaStoreDat;Persist Security Info=False;User ID=sales_user;Password=mystrongpwd;MultipleActiveResultSets=False;Encrypt=True;TrustServerCertificate=False;Connection Timeout=30; (you will need to alter this connection string for your own Azure SQL server and database)
    2. DatEnvironment = dat (ie in lower case)
  8. In the Tasks tab add 15 Deploy to Kubernetes tasks and disable all but the first one so the release can be tested after each task is configured. Note that when configuring the tasks below only the required entries and changes to defaults are listed.
  9. Configure the first Deploy to Kubernetes task as follows:
    1. Display name = Delete image pull secret
    2. Kubernetes Service Connection = [name of Kubernetes Service Connection endpoint]
    3. Namespace = $(DatEnvironment)
    4. Command = delete
    5. Arguments = secret $(AcrAuthenticationSecret)
    6. Control Options > Continue on error = checked
  10. Configure the second Deploy to Kubernetes task as follows:
    1. Display name = Create image pull secret
    2. Kubernetes Service Connection = [name of Kubernetes Service Connection endpoint]
    3. Namespace = $(DatEnvironment)
    4. Command = create
    5. Arguments = secret docker-registry $(AcrAuthenticationSecretName) --namespace=$(DatEnvironment) --docker-server=$(AcrName).azurecr.io --docker-username=$(AcrName) --docker-password=$(AcrPassword) --docker-email=fred@bloggs.com (note that the email address can be anything you like)
  11. Configure the third Deploy to Kubernetes task as follows:
    1. Display name = Delete ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT config map
    2. Kubernetes Service Connection = [name of Kubernetes Service Connection endpoint]
    3. Namespace = $(DatEnvironment)
    4. Command = delete
    5. Arguments = configmap aspnetcore.env
    6. Control Options > Continue on error = checked
  12. Configure the fourth Deploy to Kubernetes task as follows:
    1. Display name = Create ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT config map
    2. Kubernetes Service Connection = [name of Kubernetes Service Connection endpoint]
    3. Namespace = $(DatEnvironment)
    4. Command = create
    5. Arguments = configmap aspnetcore.env --from-literal=ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT=$(DatEnvironment)
  13. Configure the fifth Deploy to Kubernetes task as follows:
    1. Display name = Delete DB_CONNECTION_STRING secret
    2. Kubernetes Service Connection = [name of Kubernetes Service Connection endpoint]
    3. Namespace = $(DatEnvironment)
    4. Command = delete
    5. Arguments = secret db.connection
    6. Control Options > Continue on error = checked
  14. Configure the sixth Deploy to Kubernetes task as follows:
    1. Display name = Create DB_CONNECTION_STRING secret
    2. Kubernetes Service Connection = [name of Kubernetes Service Connection endpoint]
    3. Namespace = $(DatEnvironment)
    4. Command = create
    5. Arguments = secret generic db.connection --from-literal=DB_CONNECTION_STRING="$(DatDbConn)"
  15. Configure the seventh Deploy to Kubernetes task as follows:
    1. Display name = Delete MESSAGE_QUEUE_URL config map
    2. Kubernetes Service Connection = [name of Kubernetes Service Connection endpoint]
    3. Namespace = $(DatEnvironment)
    4. Command = delete
    5. Arguments = configmap message.queue
    6. Control Options > Continue on error = checked
  16. Configure the eighth Deploy to Kubernetes task as follows:
    1. Display name = Create MESSAGE_QUEUE_URL config map
    2. Kubernetes Service Connection = [name of Kubernetes Service Connection endpoint]
    3. Namespace = $(DatEnvironment)
    4. Command = create
    5. Arguments = configmap message.queue --from-literal=MESSAGE_QUEUE_URL=nats://message-queue-service.$(DatEnvironment):4222
  17. Configure the ninth Deploy to Kubernetes task as follows:
    1. Display name = Create message-queue service
    2. Kubernetes Service Connection = [name of Kubernetes Service Connection endpoint]
    3. Namespace = $(DatEnvironment)
    4. Command = apply
    5. Use Configuration files = checked
    6. Configuration File = $(System.DefaultWorkingDirectory)/_MegaStore/k8s-config/message-queue-service.yaml
  18. Configure the tenth Deploy to Kubernetes task as follows:
    1. Display name = Create megastore-web service
    2. Kubernetes Service Connection = [name of Kubernetes Service Connection endpoint]
    3. Namespace = $(DatEnvironment)
    4. Command = apply
    5. Use Configuration files = checked
    6. Configuration File = $(System.DefaultWorkingDirectory)/_MegaStore/k8s-config/megastore-web-service.yaml
  19. Configure the eleventh Deploy to Kubernetes task as follows:
    1. Display name = Create message-queue deployment
    2. Kubernetes Service Connection = [name of Kubernetes Service Connection endpoint]
    3. Namespace = $(DatEnvironment)
    4. Command = apply
    5. Use Configuration files = checked
    6. Configuration File = $(System.DefaultWorkingDirectory)/_MegaStore/k8s-config/message-queue-deployment.yaml
  20. Configure the twelfth Deploy to Kubernetes task as follows:
    1. Display name = Create megastore-web deployment
    2. Kubernetes Service Connection = [name of Kubernetes Service Connection endpoint]
    3. Namespace = $(DatEnvironment)
    4. Command = apply
    5. Use Configuration files = checked
    6. Configuration File = $(System.DefaultWorkingDirectory)/_MegaStore/k8s-config/message-queue-deployment.yaml
  21. Configure the thirteenth Deploy to Kubernetes task as follows:
    1. Display name = Update megastore-web with latest image
    2. Kubernetes Service Connection = [name of Kubernetes Service Connection endpoint]
    3. Namespace = $(DatEnvironment)
    4. Command = set
    5. Arguments = image deployment/megastore-web-deployment megastoreweb=$(AcrName).azurecr.io/megastoreweb:$(Build.BuildNumber)
  22. Configure the fourteenth Deploy to Kubernetes task as follows:
    1. Display name = Create megastore-savesalehandler deployment
    2. Kubernetes Service Connection = [name of Kubernetes Service Connection endpoint]
    3. Namespace = $(DatEnvironment)
    4. Command = apply
    5. Use Configuration files = checked
    6. Configuration File = $(System.DefaultWorkingDirectory)/_MegaStore/k8s-config/megastore-savesalehandler-deployment.yaml
  23. Configure the fifthteenth Deploy to Kubernetes task as follows:
    1. Display name = Update megastore-savesalehandler with latest image
    2. Kubernetes Service Connection = [name of Kubernetes Service Connection endpoint]
    3. Namespace = $(DatEnvironment)
    4. Command = set
    5. Arguments = image deployment/megastore-savesalehandler-deployment megastoresavesalehandler=$(AcrName).azurecr.io/megastoresavesalehandler:$(Build.BuildNumber)

That's a heck of a lot of configuration, so what exactly have we built?

The first eight tasks deal with the configuration that support the services and deployments:

  • The image pull secret stores the credentials to the Azure Container Registry so that deployments that need to pull images from the ACR can authenticate.
  • The ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT config map sets the environment for ASP.NET Core. I don't do anything with this but it could be handy for troubleshooting purposes.
  • The DB_CONNECTION_STRING secret stores the connection string to the Azure SQL database and is used by the megastore-savesalehandler-deployment.yaml configuration.
  • The MESSAGE_QUEUE_URL config map stores the URL to the NATS message queue and is used by the megastore-web-deployment.yaml and megastore-savesalehandler-deployment.yaml configurations.

As mentioned above, a limitation of the VSTS Deploy to Kubernetes task means that in order to be able to update Secrets and ConfigMaps they need to be deleted first and then created again. This does mean that an exception is thrown the first time a delete task is run however the Continue on error option ensures that the release doesn't fail.

The remaining seven tasks deal with the deployment and configuration of the components (other than the Azure SQL database) that make up the MegaStore application:

  • The NATS message queue requires a service so other components can talk to it and the deployment that specifies the specification for the image.
  • The MegaStore.Web front end requires a service so that it is exposed to the outside world and the deployment that specifies the specification for the image.
  • MegaStore.SaveSalehandler monitoring component only needs the deployment that specifies the specification for the image as nothing connects to it directly.

If everything has been configured correctly then triggering a release should result in a megastore-web-service being created. You can check the deployment was successful by executing kubectl get services --namespace=dat to get the external IP address of the LoadBalancer which you can paste in to a browser to confirm that the ASP.NET Core website is running. On the backend, you can use SQL Server Management Studio to connect to the database and confirm that records are being created in dbo.Sale.

If you are running in to problems, you can run the Kubernetes Dashboard to find out what is failing. Typically it's deployments that fail, and navigating to Workloads > Deployments can highlight the failing deployment. You can find out what the error is from the New Replica Set panel by clicking on the Logs icon which brings up a new browser tab with a command line style output of the error. If there is no error it displays any Console.WiteLine output. Very neat:

Create a PRD Release Environment in VSTS

With a DAT environment created we can now create other environments on the route to production. This could be whatever else is needed to test the application, however here I'm just going to create a production environment I'll call PRD. I described this process in my previous post so here I'll just list the high level process:

  1. Clone the DAT environment and rename it PRD.
  2. In the Variables tab rename the cloned DatDbConn and DatEnvironment variables (the ones with PRD scope) to PrdDbConn and PrdEnvironment and change their values accordingly.
  3. In the Tasks tab visit each task and change all references of $(DatDbConn) and $(DatEnvironment) to $(PrdDbConn) and $(PrdEnvironment). All Namespace fields will need changing and many of the tasks with use the Arguments fields will need attention.
  4. Trigger a build and check the deployment was successful by executing kubectl get services --namespace=prd to get the external IP address of the LoadBalancer which you can paste in to a browser to confirm that the ASP.NET Core website is running.

Wrapping Up

Although the final result is a CI/CD pipeline that certainly works there are more tasks than I'm happy with due to the need to delete and then recreate Secrets and ConfigMaps and this also adds quite a bit of overhead to the time it takes to deploy to an environment. There's bound to be a more elegant way of doing this that either exists now and I just don't know about it or that will exist in the future. Do post in the comments if you have thoughts.

Although I'm three posts in I've barely scratched the surface of the different topics that I could cover, so plenty more to come in this series. Next time it will probably be around health and / or monitoring.

Cheers—Graham

Deploy a Dockerized ASP.NET Core Application to Kubernetes on Azure Using a VSTS CI/CD Pipeline: Part 2

Posted by Graham Smith on March 21, 2018No Comments (click here to comment)

If you need to provision a new environment for your deployment pipeline, what's your process and how long does it take? For many of us the process probably starts with a request to an infrastructure team for new virtual machines. If the new VMs are in Azure the request might be completed quite quickly; if they are on premises it might take much longer. In both scenarios you might have to justify your request: there will be actual cost in Azure and on premises it's another chunk of the datacentre ‘gone'.

With the help of containers and container orchestrators I predict (and sincerely hope) that this sort of pain will become a distant memory for much of the software development community for whom it is currently an issue. The reason is that container orchestration technologies abstract away the virtual (or physical) server layer and allow you to focus on configuring services and how they communicate with each other—all through configuration files. The only time you'd need to think of virtual (or physical) servers is if the cluster running your orchestrator needed more capacity, in which case someone will need to add more nodes. A whole new environment for your pipeline just by doing some work with a configuration file? What's not to like?

In this blog post I hope to make my prediction come alive by showing you how new environments can be quickly created using Kubernetes running in Microsoft's Azure Container Service (AKS), crucially using declarative configuration files that get deployed as part of a VSTS release pipeline. This post follows directly on from a previous post, both in terms of understanding and also the components that were built in that first post, so if you haven't already done so I recommend working your way through that post before going further.

Housekeeping

In the previous post we deployed to the default namespace so it probably makes sense to clean all this up. This can all be done by the command line of course but to mix it up a bit I'll illustrate using the Kubernetes Dashboard. You can start the dashboard using the following command, substituting in the name of your resource group and the name of the cluster:

This should open the dashboard in a browser displaying the default namespace. Navigate to Workloads > Deployments and using the hamburger menu delete the deployment:

Navigate to Discovery and Load Balancing > Services and delete the service:

Navigate to Config and Storage > Secret and delete the secret:

Environments and Namespaces

The Kubernetes feature that we'll use to create environments that together form part of our pipeline is Namespaces. You can think of namespaces as a way to divide the Kubernetes cluster in to virtual clusters. Within a namespace resource names need to be unique but they don't have to be across namespaces. This is great because effectively we have network isolation so that across each environment resource names stay the same. Say goodbye to having to append the environment name to all the resources in your environment to make them unique.

In this post I'll make a pipeline consisting of two environments. I'm sticking with a convention I established several years ago so I'll be creating DAT (developer automated test) and PRD (production) environments. In a complete pipeline I might also create a DQC (developer quality control) environment to sit between DAT and PRD but that won't really add anything extra to this exercise.

First up is to create the namespaces. There is an argument for saying that namespace creation should be part of the release pipeline however in this post I'm going to create everything manually as I think it helps to understand what's going on. Create a file called namespaces.yaml and add the following contents:

Note that namespace name needs to be in lower case as it needs to be DNS compatible. Open a command prompt at the same location as namespaces.yaml and execute the the following command: kubectl create -f namespaces.yaml. You should get a message back advising the namespaces have been created and at one level that's all there is to it. However there's a couple of extra bits worth knowing.

When you first start working with kubectl at the command line you are working in the default namespace. To work with other namespaces needs some configuration.

To return details of the configuration stored in C:\Users\<username>\.kube\config use:

My cluster returned the following output:

From this output you need to determine your cluster name (which you probably already know) as well as the name of the user. These details are fed in to the following command for creating a new context for an environment (in this case the DAT environment):

To switch to working to this context (and hence the dat namespace) use:

To confirm (or check) the current context use:

To get back to the default namespace use:

Normally that would be most of what you need to know to work with namespaces, however as of the time of writing there is a bug in the VSTS Deploy to Kubernetes task which requires some extra work. The bug may be fixed by the time you read this however it's handy to examine the issue to further understand what is going on behind the scenes.

Each namespace needs to access the Azure Container Registry (ACR) we created in the previous post to pull down images. This is a private registry so we don't want open access and so some form of authentication is required. This is provided by the creation of a Kubernetes secret that holds the authentication details to the ACR. The VSTS Deploy to Kubernetes task can create this secret for us however the bug is that it only creates the secret for the default namespace and fails to create the secret when a different namespace is specified. The workaround is to create the secret manually in each namespace using the following command:

In the above command secret-name is any arbitrary name you choose for the secret, namespace is the namespace in which to create the secret, acr-name is the name of your ACR, acr-admin-password is the password from the Access keys panel of your ACR and any-valid-email-address is just that. You'll need to run this command for each namespace of course. One final thing: you'll need to make sure that in the codebase the imagePullSecrets name in deployment.yaml matches the name of the secret you just created.

Amend the VSTS Pipeline to Support Multiple Environments

In this section we amend the release pipeline that was built in the previous post to support multiple environments.

  1. In the Pipeline tab rename Environment 1 to DAT:
  2. In the Variables tab create a variable to hold the name of the secret created above to authenticate with ACR. Create a second variable for the DAT environment namespace and change its scope to DAT. Remember that the value needs to be lower case:
  3. In the Tasks tab amend all three Deploy to Kubernetes tasks so that the Namespace field contains the $(DatEnvironment) variable. At the same time ensure that Secret name field matches the name of the secret variable created above:
  4. In order to test that deploying to DAT works, either trigger a build or, if you updated deployment.yaml above on your workstation commit your code. If the deployment was successful find the external IP address of the LoadBalancer by executing kubectl get services --namespace=dat and paste in to a browser to confirm that the ASP.NET Core website is running.

Amend the VSTS Pipeline to Support a New Environment

Now for the fun bit where we see just how easy it is to configure a new, network-isolated environment.

  1. In the Pipeline tab use the arrow next to Environments > Add to show and then select Clone environment:
  2. Rename the cloned environment to PRD. Create a new variable (ie PrdEnvironment) scoped to PRD to hold the prd namespace and amend each of the three Deploy to Kubernetes tasks so that the Namespace field contains the $(PrdEnvironment) variable.
  3. Trigger a build and check the deployment was successful by executing kubectl get services --namespace=prd to get the external IP address of the LoadBalancer which you can paste in to a browser to confirm that the ASP.NET Core website is running.

And That's It!

Yep—that really is all there is to it! Okay, this is just a trivial example, however even with more services the procedure would be the same. Granted, in a more complex application there might be some environment variables or secrets that might change but even so, it's just configuration.

I'm thrilled by the power that Kubernetes gives to developers—no more thinking about VMs or tin, no more having to append resources with environment names, and the ability to create a new environment in the blink of an eye—wow!

There's lots more I'm planning to cover in the deployment pipeline space however next time I'll be looking at the development inner loop and the options for running Kubernetes whilst developing code.

Cheers—Graham

Deploy a Dockerized ASP.NET Core Application to Kubernetes on Azure Using a VSTS CI/CD Pipeline: Part 1

Posted by Graham Smith on February 20, 2018No Comments (click here to comment)

Over the past 18 months or so I've written a handful of blog posts about deploying Docker containers using Visual Studio Team Services (VSTS). The first post covered deploying a container to a Linux VM running Docker and other posts covered deploying containers to a cluster running DC/OS—all running in Microsoft Azure. Fast forward to today and everything looks completely different from when I wrote that first post: Docker is much more mature with features such as multi-stage builds dramatically streamlining the process of building source code and packaging it in to containers, and Kubernetes has emerged as a clear leader in the container orchestration battle and looks set to be a game-changing technology. (If you are new to Kubernetes I have a Getting Started blog post here with plenty of useful learning resources and tips for getting started.)

One of the key questions that's been on my mind recently is how to use Kubernetes as part of a CI/CD pipeline, specifically using VSTS to deploy to Microsoft's Azure Container Service (AKS), which is now specifically targeted at managing hosted Kubernetes environments. So in a new series of posts I'm going to be examining that very question, with each post building on previous posts as I drill deeper in to the details. In this post I'm starting as simply as I possibly can whilst still answering the key question of how to use VSTS to deploy to Kubernetes. Consequently I'm ignoring the Kubernetes experience on the development workstation, I only deploy a very simple application to one environment and I'm not looking at scaling or rolling updates. All this will come later, but meantime I hope you'll find that this walkthrough will whet your appetite for learning more about CI/CD and Kubernetes.

Development Workstation Configuration

These are the main tools you'll need on a Windows 10 Pro development workstation (I've documented the versions of certain tools at the time of writing but in general I'm always on the latest version):

  • Visual Studio 2017—version 15.5.6 with the ASP.NET and web development workload.
  • Docker for Windows—stable channel 17.12.0-ce.
  • Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL)—see here for installation details. I'm still using Bash on Ubuntu on Windows that I installed before WSL moved to the Microsoft Store and in this post I assume you are using Ubuntu. The aim of installing WSL is to run Azure CLI, although technically you don't need WSL as Azure CLI will run happily under a Windows command prompt. However using WSL facilitates running Azure CLI commands from a Bash script.
  • Azure CLI on Windows Subsystem for Linux—see here for installation (and subsequent upgrade) instructions. There are several ways to login to Azure from the CLI however I've found that the interactive log-in works well since once you're logged-in you remain so for quite a long time (many days for me so far). Use az -v to check which version you are on (2.0.27 was latest at time of writing).
  • kubectl on Azure CLI—the kubectl CLI is used to interact with a Kubernetes cluster. Install using sudo az aks install-cli.

Create Services in Microsoft Azure

There are several services you will need to set up in Microsoft Azure:

  • Azure Container Registry—see here for an overview and links to the various methods for creating an ACR. I use the Standard SKU for the better performance and increased storage.
  • Azure Container Service (AKS) cluster—see here for more details about AKS and how to create a cluster, however you may find it easier to use my script below. I started off by creating a cluster and then destroying it after each use until I did some tests and found that a one-node cluster was costing pennies per day rather than the pounds per day I had assumed it would cost and now I just keep the cluster running.
    • From a WSL Bash prompt run nano create_k8s_cluster.sh to bring up the nano editor with a new empty file. Copy and paste (by pressing right mouse key) the following script:
    • Change the variables to your suit your requirements. If you only have one Azure subscription you can delete the lines that set a particular subscription as the default, otherwise use az account list to list your subscriptions to find the ID.
    • Exit out of nano making sure you save the changes (Ctrl +X, Y) and then apply permissions to make it executable by running chmod 700 create_k8s_cluster.sh.
    • Next run the script using ./create_k8s_cluster.sh.
    • One the cluster is fully up-and-running you can show the Kubernetes dashboard using az aks browse --resource-group $resourceGroup --name $clusterName.
    • You can also start to use the kubectl CLI to explore the cluster. Start with kubectl get nodes and then have a look at this cheat sheet for more commands to run.
    • The cluster will probably be running an older version of Kubernetes—you can check and find the procedure for upgrading here.
  • Private VSTS Agent on Linux—you can use the hosted agent (called Hosted Linux Preview at time of writing) but I find it runs very slowly and additionally because a new agent is used every time you perform a build it has to pull docker images down each time which adds to the slowness. In a future post I'll cover running a VSTS agent from a Docker image running on the Kubernetes cluster but for now you can create a private Linux agent running on a VM using these instructions. Although they date back to October 2016 they still work fine (I've checked them and tweaked them slightly).
    • Since we will only need this agent to build using Docker you can skip steps 5b, 5c and 5d.
    • Install a newer version of Git—I used these instructions.
    • Install docker-compose using these instructions and choosing the Linux tab.
    • Make the docker-user a member of the docker group by executing usermod -aG docker ${USER}.

Create VSTS Endpoints

In order to talk to the various Azure services you will need to create the following endpoints in VSTS (from the cog icon on the toolbar choose Services > New Service Endpoint):

  • Azure Resource Manager—to point to your MSDN subscription. You'll need to authenticate as part of the process.
  • Kubernetes Service Connection—to point to your Kubernetes cluster. You'll need the FQDN to the cluster (prepended with https://) which you can get from the Azure CLI by executing az aks show --resource-group $resourceGroup --name $clusterName, passing in your own resource group and cluster names. You'll also need the contents of the kubeconfig file. If you used the script above to create the cluster then the script copied the config file to C:\Users\Public and you can use Notepad to copy the contents.

Configure a CI Build

The first step to deploying containers to a Kubernetes cluster is to configure a CI build that creates a container and then pushes the container to a Docker registry—Azure Container Registry in this case.

Create a Sample App
  • Within an existing Team Project create a new Git repository (Code > $current repository$ > New repository) called k8s-aspnetcore. Feel free to select the options to add a README and a VisualStudio .gitignore.
  • Clone this repo on your development workstation:
    • Open PowerShell at the desired root folder.
    • Copy the URL from the VSTS code view of the new repository.
    • At the PowerShell prompt execute git clone along with the pasted URL.
  • Make sure Docker for Windows is running.
  • In Visual Studio create an ASP.NET Core Web Application in the folder the git clone command created.
  • Choose an MVC app and enable Docker support for Linux.
  • You should now be able to run your application using the green Docker run button on the Standard toolbar. What is interesting here is that the build process is using a multi-stage Dockerfile, ie the tooling to build the application is running from a Docker container. See Steve Lasker's post here for more details.
  • In the root of the repository folder create a folder named k8s-config, which we'll use later to store Kubernetes configuration files. In Visual Studio create a New Solution Folder with the same name and back in the file system folder create empty files named service.yaml and deployment.yaml. In Visual Studio add these files as existing items to the newly created solution folder.
  • The final step here is to commit the code and sync it with VSTS.
Create a VSTS Build
  • In VSTS create a new build based on the repository created above and start with an empty process.
  • After the wizard stage of the setup supply an appropriate name for the build and select the Agent queue created above if you are using the recommended private agent or Hosted Linux Preview if not.
  • Go ahead and perform a Save & queue to make sure this initial configuration succeeds.
  • In the Phase 1 panel use + to add two Docker Compose tasks and one Publish Build Artifacts task.
  • If you want to be able to perform a Save & queue after configuring each task (recommended) then right-click the second and third tasks and disable them.
  • Configure the first Docker Compose task as follows:
    • Display name = Build service images
    • Container Registry Type = Azure Container Registry
    • Azure subscription = [name of Azure Resource Manager endpoint created above]
    • Azure Container Registry = [name of Azure Container Registry created above]
    • Docker Compose File = **/docker-compose.yml
    • Project Name = $(Build.Repository.Name)
    • Qualify Image Names = checked
    • Action = Build service images
    • Additional Image Tags = $(Build.BuildId)
    • Include Latest Tag = checked
  • Configure the second Docker Compose task as follows:
    • Display name = Push service images
    • Container Registry Type = Azure Container Registry
    • Azure subscription = [name of Azure Resource Manager endpoint created above]
    • Azure Container Registry = [name of Azure Container Registry created above]
    • Docker Compose File = **/docker-compose.yml
    • Project Name = $(Build.Repository.Name)
    • Qualify Image Names = checked
    • Action = Push service images
    • Additional Image Tags = $(Build.BuildId)
    • Include Latest Tag = checked
  • Configure the Publish Build Artifacts task as follows:
    • Display name = Publish k8s config
    • Path to publish = k8s-config (this is the folder we created earlier in the repository root folder)
    • Artifact name = k8s-config
    • Artifact publish location = Visual Studio Team Services/TFS
  • Finally, in the Triggers section of the build editor check Enable continuous integration so that the build will trigger on a commit from Visual Studio.

So what does this build do? The first Docker Compose task uses the docker-compose.yml file to work out what images need building as specified by Dockerfile file(s) for different services. We only have one service (k8s-aspnetcore) but there could (and usually would) be more. With the image built on the VSTS agent the second Docker Compose task pushes the image to the Azure Container Registry. If you navigate to this ACR in the Azure portal and drill in to the Repositories section you should see your image. The build also publishes the yaml configuration files needed to deploy to the cluster.

Configure a Release Pipeline

We are now ready to configure a release to deploy the image that's hosted in ACR to our Kubernetes cluster. Note that you'll need to complete all of this section before you can perform a release.

Create a VSTS Release Definition
  • In VSTS create a new release definition, starting with an empty process and changing the name to k8s-aspnetcore.
  • In the Artifacts panel click on Add artifact and wire-up the build we created above.
  • With the build now added as an artifact click on the lightning bolt to enable the Continuous deployment trigger.
  • In the default Environment 1 click on 1phase, 0 task and in the Agent phase click on + to create three Deploy to Kubernetes tasks.
  • Configure the first Deploy to Kubernetes task as follows:
    • Display name = Create Service
    • Kubernetes Service Connection = [name of Kubernetes Service Connection endpoint created above]
    • Command = apply
    • Use Configuration files = checked
    • Configuration File = $(System.DefaultWorkingDirectory)/k8s-aspnetcore/k8s-config/service.yaml
    • Container Registry Type = Azure Container Registry
    • Azure subscription = [name of Azure Resource Manager endpoint created above]
    • Azure Container Registry = [name of Azure Container Registry created above]
    • Secret name [any secret word of your choosing, to be used consistently across all tasks]
  • Configure the second Deploy to Kubernetes task as follows:
    • Display name = Create Deployment
    • Kubernetes Service Connection = [name of Kubernetes Service Connection endpoint created above]
    • Command = apply
    • Use Configuration files = checked
    • Configuration File = $(System.DefaultWorkingDirectory)/k8s-aspnetcore/k8s-config/deployment.yaml
    • Container Registry Type = Azure Container Registry
    • Azure subscription = [name of Azure Resource Manager endpoint created above]
    • Azure Container Registry = [name of Azure Container Registry created above]
    • Secret name [any secret word of your choosing, to be used consistently across all tasks]
  • Configure the third Deploy to Kubernetes task as follows:
    • Display name = Update with Latest Image
    • Kubernetes Service Connection = [name of Kubernetes Service Connection endpoint created above]
    • Command = set
    • Arguments = image deployment/k8s-aspnetcore-deployment k8s-aspnetcore=$yourAcrNameHere$.azurecr.io/k8s-aspnetcore:$(Build.BuildId)
    • Container Registry Type = Azure Container Registry
    • Azure subscription = [name of Azure Resource Manager endpoint created above]
    • Azure Container Registry = [name of Azure Container Registry created above]
    • Secret name [any secret word of your choosing, to be used consistently across all tasks]
  • Make sure you save the release but don't bother testing it out just yet as it won't work.
Create the Kubernetes configuration
  • In Visual Studio paste the following code in to the service.yaml file created above.
  • Paste the following code in to the deployment.yaml file created above. The code is for my ACR so you will need to amend accordingly.
  • You can now commit these changes and then head over to VSTS to check that the release was successful.
  • If the release was successful you should be able to see the ASP.NET Core website in your browser. You can find the IP address by executing kubectl get services from wherever you installed kubectl.
  • Another command you might try running is kubectl describe deployment $nameOfYourDeployment, where $nameOfYourDeployment is the metadata > name in deployment.yaml. A quick tip here is that if you only have one deployment you only need to type the first letter of it.
  • It's worth noting that splitting the service and deployment configurations in to separate files isn't necessarily a best practice however I'm doing it here to try and help clarify what's going on.

In terms of a very high level explanation of what we've just configured in the release pipeline, for a simple application such as an ASP.NET Core website we need to deploy two key objects:

  1. A Kubernetes Service which (in our case) is configured with an external IP address and acts as an abstraction layer for Pods which are killed off and recreated every time a new release is triggered. This is handled by the first Deploy to Kubernetes task.
  2. A Kubernetes Deployment which describes the nature of the deployment—number of Pods (via Replica Sets), how they will be upgraded and so on. This is handled by the second Deploy to Kubernetes task.

On first deployment these two objects are all that is needed to perform a release. However, because of the declarative nature of these objects they do nothing on subsequent release if they haven't changed. This is where the third Deploy to Kubernetes task comes in to play—ensuring that after the first release subsequent releases do cause the container to be updated.

Wrapping Up

That concludes our initial look at CI/CD with VSTS and Azure Container Service (AKS)! As I mentioned at the beginning of the post I've purposely tried to keep this walkthrough as simple as possible, so watch out for the next installment where I'll build on what I've covered here.

Cheers—Graham